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Tag: Montenegro

The political consequences of NATO membership for Montenegro

Montenegro's NATO membership has opened new avenues of military cooperation and greater political influence. A politically divided Montenegro continues to see NATO as a pillar to its stability.

June 28, 2021 - Visar Xhambazi

Montenegro, the first victim of China’s debt-trap diplomacy

As Montenegro struggles to stay afloat financially having to repay a large Chinese loan, the EU refuses to help Montenegro, providing an excellent opportunity for China to get more than a foothold in the country.

May 7, 2021 - Visar Xhambazi

The price of democracy in Montenegro

The electoral defeat of the Democratic Party of Socialists in Montenegro opens a new chapter in the country's politics. It remains to be seen what the reaction of the parties representing the minorities in the country will be to the new situation of their traditional allies.

November 13, 2020 - Austin Doehler

Unity within Montenegro’s Albanian community would benefit the whole country

As in the previous elections, Albanian parties in Montenegro have failed to form a joint coalition.

August 6, 2020 - Visar Xhambazi

New enlargement strategy of the EU: a new chance for the Balkans

With a new enlargement strategy, the European Union gives itself more time while candidates and potential candidates claim a new chance to focus more seriously on upcoming reforms.

March 31, 2020 - Svjetlana Ramic Markovic

Talk Eastern Europe Episode 9: What’s up in the Western Balkans?

This episode takes a closer look at the current developments in the Western Balkans, including the North Macedonian name agreement, the Kosovo-Serbia border swap negotiations and recent protests in Serbia and Montenegro.

April 1, 2019 - Adam Reichardt Maciej Makulski

Milo Djukanović: Stepping down or stepping aside?

Following the October 16th parliamentary election in Montenegro, in which Milo Djukanović’s Democratic Party of Socialists (DPS) won 36 of the 81 seats, it appears that the DPS will form a government, subject to a coalition agreement being reached. The party had the largest share of the vote, though the margin of their victory was not sufficient to gain a majority that would allow them to govern alone. Thus negotiations between the DPS and a number of ethnic minority parties are ongoing, and it is likely that a governing coalition will be forged in the coming days. The job of leading the government will, however, now fall to Montenegro’s prime minister-designate, Duško Marković, the former head of Montenegrin state security and a close ally of Djukanović.

November 4, 2016 - Kenneth Morrison

Montenegro’s election: Different context, same outcome

Montenegrin politics has been dominated by the Democratic Party of Socialists (DPS), the successors of the Montenegrin League of Communists (SKCG), since the former Yugoslav republic’s first multi-party elections in 1990. The party’s leading figure, Milo Djukanović, has held the position of either prime minster or president (excluding two short sabbaticals) constantly since then. The latest elections promised to be the most closely contested since Montenegro regained its independence in 2006. And while the DPS’s hold on power had been relatively stable since (though coalition agreements were needed to ensure this), the striking difference in the latest parliamentary election was that the DPS were contesting them independently (not in a pre-election coalition), as were their partners in the governing coalition created after the 2012 election. The outcome of the vote was, therefore, rather unpredictable.

October 17, 2016 - Kenneth Morrison

Is NATO ditching Georgia’s dream?

If you arrive in Tbilisi – the capital of Georgia – by plane, before you get to the city centre from the airport, you will have to drive along the George W. Bush highway. The former US President remains highly popular, especially with western minded Georgians, not least because of his staunch support for the democratic transition of the former Soviet country – and especially for his efforts to make Georgia a member of NATO. It was Bush who tried to convince his European counterparts in 2008 to grant Georgia a membership action plan (MAP) together with Ukraine, which would have put both countries officially on track to joining the military alliance. But due to resistance from France and Germany all he got was the binding promise that “these countries would become members of NATO” in the future, noted in the final declaration of the summit.

July 14, 2016 - Shalva Dzidziguri

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