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Tag: Central and Eastern Europe

The Czech Republic and the Eastern European agenda: many challenges, new opportunities

On July 1st, the Czech Republic took over the Council of the European Union’s presidency. This has happened at a time of enormous pressure, as the union is faced with the Russian war against Ukraine. Czechia’s performance may benefit particularly from a clear consensus when it comes to sanctions on Moscow. Under a responsible leadership, the state may not only help bring an end to the violence in Ukraine but also lead the country closer to the bloc.

August 2, 2022 - Pavel Havlicek

Colonialism and trauma in Central and Eastern Europe

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has provided the region with an opportune moment to examine its own deep-rooted legacies of colonialism. Subjected to outside rule in various forms over the past two centuries, the region could now finally grasp the chance to overcome this trauma and truly claim its “subjectivity” on the international stage.

July 1, 2022 - Miłosz J. Cordes

Central and Eastern Europe’s emerging relations with India in the context of the Russo-Ukrainian War

Much has been made of India’s seemingly neutral position on the war in Ukraine. Whilst the country has maintained many traditional links with Moscow, New Delhi’s growing importance on the global stage offers a range of new opportunities for states across Central and Eastern Europe.

June 7, 2022 - Jakub Bornio Priya Vijaykumar Poojary

French interests in Central and Eastern Europe

France and Central and Eastern Europe do not currently possess a very high-profile political relationship. Nevertheless, the region is quickly becoming an essential part of Paris’s foreign policy.

January 21, 2022 - Soso Chachanidze

COP26 and Central and Eastern Europe: Views from the region

A climate summit may not be the most obvious place for regional states to make their diplomatic mark. Certainly, the area’s capitals have often been viewed as simply disinterested in such matters. Despite this, November’s pivotal COP26 talks have seemingly sparked a new wave of political engagement.

October 29, 2021 - Niall Gray

Three Seas? Yes, please!

The Biden administration could use the Three Seas Initiative to engage with Central and Eastern Europe and counter Russian and Chinese influence in the region.

July 30, 2021 - Kaitlyn Lee

Remembrance, history, and justice. Coming to terms with traumatic pasts in democratic societies

A review of Remembrance, History, and Justice: Coming to terms with traumatic pasts in democratic societies. Editors: Vladimir Tismaneanu and Bogdan C. Iacob. Publisher: Central European University Press, Budapest, 2016.

June 22, 2021 - Juho Nikko

The fading “charm offensive”: Is China losing its game in Central and Eastern Europe?

While some CEE states still remain eager to deepen their links with Beijing, the absences at the summit in February could point to a reverse tendency.

April 2, 2021 - Eter Glurjidze Soso Dzamukashvili

Yiddish-German: from Central Europe to the Holocaust and back?

Before the Second World War, German enjoyed the status of a global language on par with English, French and Spanish. It is a little-known fact that the German language’s vast geographic presence was possible only thanks to German-Yiddish speaking Ashkenazi Jews. While the Second World War destroyed German language and culture’s global status, it also meant the near-total 'extermination and stigmatisation of Yiddish language and culture.

January 16, 2019 - Tomasz Kamusella

Intellectuals need to compete in quality, not quantity

Interview with Marci Shore, associate professor of history at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Interviewers: Kate Langdon and Jordan Luber

KATE LANGDON AND JORDAN LUBER: What does it mean to be a public intellectual in 2018?

MARCI SHORE: I can answer this only for myself. For me, it has been important to learn to speak at different registers, to reach out to different people beyond the university and beyond my own academic field. This is a kind of translation: can I express in essence the same ideas, the ones I feel it is most important to convey at a given moment, in different kinds of language? This demands a kind of empathy with the audience, a figuring out of what is and what is not self-evident at a given moment to a given group of people. And it involves taking a risk to leap out of one’s disciplinary comfort zone.

January 2, 2019 - Jordan Luber Kate Langdon Marci Shore

Identity building after the rupture. Post-war memorials in Central and Eastern Europe

Following the First World War, a significant number of conspicuous monuments and memorials were put up in Central and Eastern Europe. More than just an attempt to come to terms with the trauma of the war, they were also a method of nation- and state-building. Consequently, it was associated with the revival or invention of traditions in order to stabilise the societies in the newly founded, re-founded or reshaped states.

The First World War was followed by the construction of mass number of monuments and memorials. In Central and Eastern Europe, however, the erection of new monuments was first preceded by the destruction of existing ones. In countries which had gained or regained their independence, symbols of the former regimes were removed from public view as they were associated with foreign rule and oppression.

November 5, 2018 - Arnold Bartetzky

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