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Clan war instead of fighting coronavirus and corruption

Chaos is probably the most accurate word to describe what has been happening recently in Kyrgyzstan. Political pluralism in this Central Asian state is so advanced that the Kyrgyz people find it difficult to understand who is currently seeing eye-to-eye with whom, who is against whom, and who calls the shots.

Nearly a month has passed since the October 4th parliamentary elections in Kyrgyzstan, but it remains unclear who is actually holding power in the country. There were as many as three individuals claiming the prime minister’s seat. President Sooronbay Jeenbekov announced that “as soon as the situation stabilises” he would be ready to step down. After the resignation of subsequent Supreme Council speakers, two of the deputies argued which one had the right to preside over the Supreme Council (the country’s parliament).
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November 16, 2020 - Ludwika Włodek - Issue 6 2020MagazineStories and ideas

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan: Monument for Manas, hero of ancient kyrgyz epos, together with national Kyrgyzstan flag on Bishkek central Ala-Too square By Teow Cek Chuan / Shutterstock

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