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Tag: nuclear weapons

The impact of the war in Ukraine on the future of Europe: what if Ukraine becomes a nuclear state?

Russia continues to issue periodic nuclear threats in relation to its invasion of Ukraine. Whether this involves nuclear weapons or power plants, it is clear that Moscow views this rhetoric as a useful tool. Questions must now be asked as to whether Kyiv may once again attempt to acquire such weapons in order to defend itself.

September 14, 2023 - Davit Totadze

Nuclear alternative

Ever since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, there have been fears that Kyiv’s admission to NATO might trigger a wider war. Despite this, it was actually the war-torn country’s non-threatening nature that encouraged Putin in the first place.

July 26, 2023 - Alex Gordon

The “7D Plan” for a post-Putin Russia to ensure global security

The ongoing war in Ukraine has focused minds in the West with regards to helping Kyiv achieve a military victory. However, little has been said in relation to a post-war Russia. The new “7D Plan” offers a model through which a reformed Russia could once again be integrated into the international community.

March 17, 2022 - Andrii Dligach Mychailo Wynnyckyj Valerii Pekar

How to stop World War Three

The besieged Ukrainian government continues to request that the West set up a no-fly zone over the country. Whilst many leaders fear that this action may lead to a wider conflict, inaction will ultimately allow Putin to use nuclear blackmail against both Ukraine and the West.

March 8, 2022 - Mychailo Wynnyckyj Valerii Pekar

The ongoing German-Polish NATO nuclear sharing nexus 

The future of NATO’s nuclear sharing programme in Central and Eastern Europe is closely connected to the political relationship between Washington, Berlin and Warsaw. Dimensions such as geopolitics and infrastructure must also be taken into account.  

July 1, 2021 - Aaron Allen

Pyongyang’s Russian sentiment

North Korea continues to play on a one man team as its nuclear tests only deepen the country’s isolation. South Korea, the United States and Japan are actively involved politically on the Korean peninsula but their goals rarely focus on issues other than international security. However, there are countries for which Kim Jong Un's regime is not only a target for international sanctions and criticism, but also an economic partner. China and Russia are part of that club. Paradoxically, maintaining good relations with Kim’s regime is important for Moscow as any potential dominance in Asia partly depends on Pyongyang’s support.

June 23, 2017 - Grzegorz Kaliszuk

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