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Author: Adam Reichardt

Talk Eastern Europe Episode 24: Georgia under threat

In this episode Adam interviews Egor Kuroptev, head of the Free Russia Foundation’s Tbilisi office.

November 26, 2019 - Adam Reichardt Maciej Makulski

Tirana’s youth find a window in the EU

The integration hopes of the region have not fully faded, especially in Tirana, Albania – the winner of the title European Youth Capital (EYC) for 2022, which was announced Thursday.

November 23, 2019 - Epidamn Zeqo

Bridge between the Military University of Land Forces in Wrocław and Canada

November 2019 - After a 10 year absence, Polish forces are back in Lebanon with the Blue Helmets for the UNIFIL peacekeeping mission (United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon) to protect the local population and bring the stability to allow for a political solution to the 30 year struggle in the region.

November 22, 2019 - New Eastern Europe

In Between Europe #23 Visegrad and growth in Europe

This episode is a forward-looking one, which builds on our previous discussion about the economic legacy of the transition.

November 19, 2019 - Zselyke Csaky and Gergely Romsics

Talk Eastern Europe Episode 23: Fukuyama on Identity and Populism

This episode features an interview with Francis Fukuyama, a professor at Stanford University and author of the recent book Identity: the demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment.

November 14, 2019 - Adam Reichardt Maciej Makulski

New (old) faces. A true makeover or cosmetic change?

Issue 6 2019 of New Eastern Europe takes a look at the new faces coming on the scene in the region and asks to what extent these new faces represent real change? Is this part of a wider trend that indicates deeper social change or is it more of the same, with just an upgraded, modern look?

November 13, 2019 - New Eastern Europe

Identity politics is nothing new

A conversation with Francis Fukuyama, professor, writer and public intellectual. Interviewer: Maciej Makulski

November 13, 2019 - Francis Fukuyama Maciej Makulski

A cold summer in Russia. A new wave of repressions and the rise of solidarity

The scale of repression in Russia is now more serious and terrifying than in 2012. At the same time, the Russian public has become more mature and fearless. Independent groups of lawyers provide free legal advice, journalists and activists defend human rights, and various crowdfunding campaigns provide financial assistance to those detained. As a result, prisoners feel encouraged even when they face the brutality of the system.

This summer was marked with a series of unprecedented political protests in Moscow, which started on June 12th and finished on September 29th. First, Russian citizens demanded justice for investigative journalist, Ivan Golunov, who was absurdly charged with the possession of an illegal substance with intent to distribute. Golunov was released days after the charges as a result of pressure from journalists, human rights activists and protesters on the streets of Moscow.

November 13, 2019 - Artem Filatov

Shadow of a bear. How Viktor Medvedchuk turned from a marginal man into a grey eminence in Ukraine

Since the collapse of communism, Viktor Medvedchuk has been a prominent face in Ukraine’s political scene. His higher ambitions, however, have never come to be realised. He is now back in the parliament raising new questions of a political comeback.

On August 29th 2019 the first session of the new Ukrainian parliament since the July elections was convened. Now, the majority of the Verkhovna Rada is held by President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s Servant of the People party which holds 254 of the 450 seats. The second largest fraction is the pro-Russian Opposition Platform – For Life; with 44 deputies, it cannot pride itself on having much influence. As a matter of fact, neither can any of the other opposition parties.

November 13, 2019 - Petro Bilian

We want to transform Ukraine

A conversation with Sviatoslav Yurash, a deputy of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine with the Servant of the People party. Interviewer: Kateryna Pryshchepa

KATERYNA PRYSHCHEPA: Can you tell us the story how you became an MP?

SVIATOSLAV YURASH: In February 2019 I joined Volodymyr Zelenskyy in his presidential run. It has a backstory, but I joined in February, and I have been with the president ever since. I think the president has his heart in the right place, and has the right team to put his mind in the right place – and the mind of the whole Ukrainian nation. And for me it was clear that a man like this could one, defeat Petro Poroshenko, and two, unite the Ukrainian nation. And that is what he has done.

November 13, 2019 - Kateryna Pryshchepa Sviatoslav Yurash

Uncertainty and risk in Lukashenka’s times

The last 25 years in Belarus should not be seen as a period of development that was based on some predetermined plan. Rather it is a story of maintaining power, local successes and the failures of one man.

The history of a country can be divided into periods of growth and decline, euphoria and insecurity, crises and rebuilding. In Belarus, however, the past 25 years can be described as the time of Alyaksandr Lukashenka. Yet, a true picture of this period is much more blurred and nuanced. It is therefore difficult to make a clear, one-sided, assessment of the last quarter century and call it a period of decline or growth.

November 13, 2019 - Andrei Kazakevich

The downfall of a captured state

In June this year Moldova ended its one-party rule and political deadlock when a pragmatic coalition of pro-democratic and pro-Russian forces took power. This coalition now faces a series of challenges, which puts justice reform and anti-corruption as the top priorities. Realistically speaking, however, to deliver any substantial outcomes the government is going to need time, support and stability.

Moldova has produced an unexpected, though much welcomed, democratic recovery after it disembarked from the oligarchic-centred political system in June 2019. The unequivocal recognition by the major powers – the European Union, the United States and Russia – was certainly instrumental in helping Moldova overcome its political deadlock. The Socialist Party and the ACUM bloc of pro-democratic forces have, for now, put aside their geopolitical differences and agreed to govern together.

November 13, 2019 - Denis Cenusa

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