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Revisiting the original loss: Crimea

The Ukrainian peninsula of Crimea has been occupied for over eight years now. The progressive establishment of Russian control and militarisation over Crimea contains a number of lessons not yet learnt about Moscow’s political strategy in the more recently occupied territories.

Prior to February 24th 2022, Crimea had been an essential part of any discussion on the security situation in and around Ukraine. In August last year, the Ukrainian government launched a new initiative called the “Crimean Platform” to place the de-occupation of Crimea on the agenda of the highest echelons of diplomacy. In fact, Ukraine organised the second summit of the Crimean Platform this summer.
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October 3, 2022 - Maksym Popovych - Hot TopicsIssue 5 2022Magazine

A Russian flag flies over homes in Sevastopol Crimea. Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian peninsula began in 2014 and has made great efforts to integrate Crimea into its political, economic and legal system. Photo: Alexey Pavlishak / Shutterstock

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