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Poland as a new frontline state

Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine not only wreaked havoc on Ukrainian society but also damaged the regional security architecture of Central and Eastern Europe. For Poland and other states on the Eastern Flank of NATO, it instantly meant that they had all become de facto frontline states.

February 24th marked the end of the world order as we know it when Russian tanks rolled into Ukrainian territory and Russian missiles started to target Ukrainian civilian and military infrastructure. It is by no means an exaggeration to claim that the international security architecture that was shaped after the Second World War is now gone. From the regional perspective, the first day of the Russian aggression changed everything for both Ukraine and its neighbours. Many of these states have been pondering whether they would be next on Putin's list.
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April 25, 2022 - Wojciech Michnik - Hot TopicsIssue 3 2022Magazine

Polish President Andrzej Duda (left) with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg meeting with troops at the Łask Military Airbase in Poland in March 2022. Photo courtesy of NATO

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