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Uncovering the paradoxes of values in Ukrainian Society

This past February was seven years since the climax of the Maidan and the sniper shootings. From today’s perspective those events are intrinsically connected to the attempted annexation of Crimea by Russia and its aggression in eastern Ukraine. When we now ask people about their feelings to those events, we cannot disregard everything we now know and all that has happened since.

Different values and attitudes and their prevalence in different societies are probably one of the most popular topics to study in social science in general and sociology in particular. Quite often we even tend to think about other societies in terms of cultural stereotypes. Data collected from a number of surveys and opinion polls over the last two years suggest some noticeable changes towards values and attitudes within Ukrainian society. Eighteen per cent of people in Ukraine think they are very happy and 60 per cent see themselves as rather happy, according to the latest edition of the World Value Survey; these numbers are 10 per cent higher than the previous edition in 2011. Similar trends are seen in other surveys with different methodologies.
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June 23, 2021 - Anna Osypchuk - Hot TopicsIssue 4 2021Magazine

In Ukraine, an absolute majority are dissatisfied with “the way things are going now”, but only about 30 per cent are ready to protest or think that protest is plausible in the foreseeable future. Photo: Oleksandr Polonskyi / Shutterstock

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