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The broken promises of Ukraine’s police reform

Gains of reform are threatened amid an exodus of Ukraine’s revolutionaries from patrol police. And failure to reform the upper echelons of the police could mean a return to the old corrupt and inefficient practices.

When Ukraine introduced a new and radically reimagined patrol police in 2015, Nazar Franchuk was one of the first to sign up. Franchuk, who spent the winter of 2013-2014 splitting his time between university exams and protesting in Ukraine’s Revolution of Dignity, wanted to bring his revolutionary energy to the new law enforcement body which was intended to replace the country’s notoriously corrupt police force.
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April 6, 2020 - Chris G. Collison - Issue 3 2020MagazineStories and ideas

The introduction of the new patrol police was perhaps the most visible of the reforms proposed by the authorities who came to power following the Revolution of Dignity. Photo by Chris Collison

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