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Tag: democratisation

Svyatoslav Vakarchuk’s prospects and challenges ahead of the parliamentary elections in Ukraine

The renowned Ukrainian musician and activist Svyatoslav Vakarchuk disappointed many by not involving himself more in the presidential election. It remains to be seen if he will have an impact on the next elections.

May 16, 2019 - Ruslan Kermach

Georgian Democracy: Pulling the blinds on a glass house

Buildings covered in glass have become a symbol of transparency and reform in Georgia. They have also become associated with a man who has placed himself above all that happens in Tbilisi.

May 6, 2019 - Nick Baigent

How Ukraine’s decentralisation makes the country more resilient and helps post-Soviet democratisation

Contrary to widely assumed western opinion, Ukraine is not pursuing decentralisation because the West tells it to, but because she has herself decided to do so. The reform helps combatting corruption and protecting Ukraine’s national sovereignty. Moreover, decentralisation practices in Ukraine can, in the future, become models for the entire post-Soviet space.

January 31, 2019 - Andreas Umland

Republic of Moldova: Transition from communism to democracy

What are some of Moldova's most pressing challenges? The deep and structural reforms that would finalise a transition to democracy are hampered by a corrupt political class, economic troubles and geopolitics. What instruments and policies could be successful in halting Moldova's roller coaster ride through stagnation and false hope?

May 16, 2018 - Anastasia Iarovoi Jenifer Albert Ludovica Smargiassi

Russia’s thorny relationship with democracy

The assassination of Boris Nemtsov in front of the Kremlin on February 27th 2015 marked the first time since the execution of Lavrentiy Beria in 1953 that a viable contender for Russian power was summarily eliminated. By the time Brezhnev forcibly ousted Khrushchev from power in 1964, the Soviet elite had tacitly agreed that power struggles between them would not result in murder; Khrushchev died eight years later, with a pension. Since 1953, the Russian political elite who came to power through illiberal and undemocratic means did not generally purge the allies of their predecessors for fear that the same would be done to them if and when they were succeeded. Perhaps, whoever ordered the assassination of Boris Nemtsov harbours no such fears.

May 31, 2017 - Naphtali Rivkin

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