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Category: Articles and Commentary

How Ukraine’s decentralisation makes the country more resilient and helps post-Soviet democratisation

Contrary to widely assumed western opinion, Ukraine is not pursuing decentralisation because the West tells it to, but because she has herself decided to do so. The reform helps combatting corruption and protecting Ukraine’s national sovereignty. Moreover, decentralisation practices in Ukraine can, in the future, become models for the entire post-Soviet space.

January 31, 2019 - Andreas Umland

Will strongman Hrytsenko appeal to Ukrainian voters?

Viktor Yushchenko's former minister of defence and his bid for the 2019 elections.

January 30, 2019 - Taras Kuzio

A blueprint solution for Kosovo: what is at stake?

In November 2005, the Contact Group for Kosovo (comprising of the US, the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Russia) stated that there would be no partitioning of the territory of Kosovo, no return of the situation to as it was in 1999, and no unification of Kosovo with any other country.

January 28, 2019 - Visar Xhambazi

Turkey at a crossroads

The ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) in Turkey originally founded itself as a secular, anti-establishment party. Now that its leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan has effectively eliminated institutional controls and silenced opposition, AKP has become the de facto establishment and amended its narrative and policies to capitalise on the increasingly authoritarian mood. As the global availability of cheap credit dwindles, will Erdogan’s government resort to further authoritarian measures?

January 28, 2019 - Medeni Sungur

Accused of terrorist propaganda by the Turkish state, an academic speaks out

Turkish academic Mahmut Çınar was recently blacklisted from his professorship because he signed a petition in support of rights for Kurdish populations. He defended himself against the accusations of terrorist propaganda in the Turkish High Court. This is his statement of defence.

January 24, 2019 - Mahmut Cinar

In the deepness of Siberian closets

Until recently a flag, painted on the balustrade, contrasted the otherwise concrete-grey waterfront next to the Angara River, which trenches the city of Irkutsk into halves. Its rainbow colors attracted attention of disapproving minds. Now it is gone, but those who painted it to hint at their irrevocable existence are still here. One of them stands at […]

January 23, 2019 - Dario Planert

Yulia Tymoshenko: A ghost of Ukraine’s past

Is Ukraine in need of a comeback by the "Gas Princess" and her not so transparent connections?

January 21, 2019 - Ariana Gic

How to talk about Ukrainian politics in the West

Hyperbolic warnings about allegedly disastrous consequences of a Tymoshenko presidency are demobilising western support for Ukrainian reforms and defence.

January 21, 2019 - Andreas Umland

Yiddish-German: from Central Europe to the Holocaust and back?

Before the Second World War, German enjoyed the status of a global language on par with English, French and Spanish. It is a little-known fact that the German language’s vast geographic presence was possible only thanks to German-Yiddish speaking Ashkenazi Jews. While the Second World War destroyed German language and culture’s global status, it also meant the near-total 'extermination and stigmatisation of Yiddish language and culture.

January 16, 2019 - Tomasz Kamusella

The perils of diplomacy: how a Christmas tree divided a nation

Christmas may be known as the season of love and kindness, but Bulgaria will remember Christmas 2018 as the season of division. A seemingly benign gift from Russia shed light on historical wounds and party politics as well as the surprising impact social media could have on bilateral diplomacy.

January 14, 2019 - Radosveta Vassileva

As Ukraine readies itself for Presidential Elections, time to read the dissertations of the candidates

What the Ukrainian political class lacks is certainly not academic titles.

January 11, 2019 - Ararat L. Osipian

Fact check of a Washington realist’s views of Ukraine

Portraying Ukraine as unstable and on the verge of greater instability has been raised by realist scholars since the early 1990s and continues to dominate much of the pro-Putin western critics of Ukraine and realists writing in the West on the Russian-Ukrainian war.

January 4, 2019 - Taras Kuzio

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