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Analysis

To fight the new Cold War, we must forget the old one

Imagine a four-kilometre-long train shooting through Siberia at a breakneck speed. It is 1951. The heroic engineer Blinov knows no fear; the tireless locomotive pulls four hundred wagons at an incredible 150 km/h. Blinov is the "New Soviet Man," quite used to performing such feats; he joyfully drives more hours, and faster, every single day. The train, built with Soviet steel and sweat, puts the mighty synergy of socialist mechanics and proletarian work ethic on display. A master of his train, Blinov is but a cog in the machine of the Soviet state. He has two goals: first – to build communism and defeat capitalism through peaceful labour; second – to shame America by showing that in the USSR, the daily conquest of the impossible is the new norm.

September 27, 2017 - Patryk Babiracki

Saakashvili’s pursuit of political importance

Saakashvili’s triumphant return to Ukraine last Sunday made for big news and opened a new chapter in the ongoing political turmoil in the country. Shortly upon arrival, Saakashvili announced his will to unite Ukrainian opposition and take power back from the diktat of oligarchs. However, his plans may prove to be difficult to realize. The ongoing criminal investigation into his abuse of power while still president of Georgia puts his political future under question, especially as the alliance between Petro Poroshenko and Bidzina Ivanishvili remains determined.

September 22, 2017 - Bartłomiej Krzysztan

Moscow’s dubious peacekeeping proposal

The Russian President Vladimir Putin has recently proposed a deployment of a United Nations peacekeeping force to the conflict zone of eastern Ukraine. The announcement came as a surprise to the international community as it represented a marked change from Putin’s limited support for peacekeepers in the past.

September 20, 2017 - Cameron Gibson

Bulgarian banker undermines the spirit of the Magnitsky Act

The Global Magnitsky Act is one of the shining lights of the American legal system. The law, which was recently updated, allows the United States government to impose restrictions on bad actors in oppressive regimes, including Russia, to punish individuals who violate human rights and profit from corruption.

September 19, 2017 - Eugen Iladi

Latvia – a potential target for Russian economic aggression?

Politically, Latvia is firmly anchored to the West through its membership of the European Union and NATO. Economically, however, the country still remains under significant Russian influence. The Kremlin has several economic instruments at its disposal which could be used to cause significant negative impact on Latvian economy. The key ones would include restricting imports of Latvian goods, banning future and liquidating existing Russian FDIs in Latvia, reducing volumes of Russian freight transit through Latvian ports, halting supplies of natural gas to Latvia, and withdrawing non-resident deposits controlled by Russia-related entities from the Latvian banking system.

August 17, 2017 - Adam Klus

How can Kyiv and Brussels improve their relations?

The Ukraine-EU summit, which took place on July 12th, brought Ukrainians back to a reality that they did not want to admit. EU leaders refused to include the words from the preamble of the EU–Ukraine Association Agreement that “the European Union acknowledges the European aspirations of Ukraine and welcomes its European choice” in the joint statement, which is why it was not adopted at all. According to the DW source, the Netherlands firmly opposed such wording, while being indirectly supported by Germany and France.

August 9, 2017 - Nagornyak Ivan

A Russia-based journalist is facing a threat of deportation to Uzbekistan

Ali Feruz (real name: Khudoberdi Nurmatov), a human rights activist and correspondent of Novaya Gazeta, one of few independent Russian newspapers, is now under threat of being deported from Russia to Uzbekistan. The deportation would carry a high risk of Ali being tortured and international pressure is needed to stop the process.

August 7, 2017 - Olga Irisova

A reset was always fake news. New sanctions are not

On August 2nd, US President Donald Trump reluctantly signed tough new sanctions against Russia, Iran and North Korea. He had little choice since they passed both houses of the US Congress unanimously; 419 to 3 in the House of Representatives and 98 to 2 in the Senate, enabling them to block any presidential veto if Trump had decided not to sign them into law.

August 4, 2017 - Taras Kuzio

Kaliningrad oblast – Russia`s formidable A2/AD bubble

Kaliningrad Oblast – Russia`s westernmost region physically separated from the mainland – has reappeared in the forefront of international security-related discourse. Liberated from virtually complete isolation with the fall of the Soviet Union, this territory was hoped to soon turn into a prosperous “bridge of co-operation” between Russia and the West.

August 2, 2017 - Sergey Sukhankin

Who remembers the Warsaw Uprising?

The 1944 Warsaw Uprising saw the destruction of one of Europe’s great cities. But it is a story not widely known outside of Poland, something the Polish government wants to put straight. We asked a random selection of Germans in Bonn what they know about the uprising as Poles commemorate its 73rd anniversary. 

August 1, 2017 - Jo Harper and Jan Darasz

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