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Author: Agnieszka Pikulicka-Wilczewska

Georgia: Ideas and struggles of the “workshop generation”

Interview with Nugzar Kokhreidze, head of the Georgian NGO Dialogue of generations (RICDOG). Interviewer: Yulia Oreshina.

February 22, 2018 - Yulia Oreshina

New German government will need to engage more deeply in the Western Balkans

Germany is a reluctant leader within the EU, even more so in external affairs. Nevertheless, it has become clear that Balkan leaders look to Berlin, rather than Brussels or other European capitals. With a new coalition government on the horizon, it is important that Germany expends some political capital on bringing the remaining Western Balkan countries further into the EU’s orbit.

February 20, 2018 - Robert Ledger

Polish Memory Law: When history becomes a source of mistrust

The changes to the Law on the Institute of National Remembrance foster a tremendous mistrust within Poland, provoke memory wars amongst states and halt reconciliation processes between nations. The memory war also puts even more spotlight on the recent political changes in Poland.

February 19, 2018 - Uladzislau Belavusau and Anna Wójcik

Kielce pogrom: The battle over memory

Interview with Michal Jaskulski, co-director of the documentary "Bogdan’s Journey". Interviewer: Paul Toetzke.

February 15, 2018 - Paul Toetzke

Doctor Love

"Sztuka kochania. Historia Michaliny Wisłockiej" (The art of lovemaking. The story of Michalina Wisłocka). A film directed by Maria Sadowska. Warsaw, Poland, 2017.

February 14, 2018 - Iwona Reichardt

Kazakhstan’s new secularity

The upcoming congress of religious leaders  may offer the Kazakh government insights into better ways of fighting national security threats related to religion. If not, the Palace of Peace and Reconciliation built in 2006 especially for inter-confessional conferences may itself become a threat to Astana’s new definition of secularity.

February 13, 2018 - Boiko Hristov

Russian: Between re-ethnicisation and pluricentrism

A more peaceful and stable world is possible. A de-ethnicised pluricentric Russian language – thus transformed into a colorful multiethnic and multicultural multitude of world Russians – could be a versatile means to this end.

February 9, 2018 - Tomasz Kamusella

A pro-Russian spiral

The pro-Russian activity in Ukraine was on the rise years before the annexation of Crimea. Every new turn allowed a test of new mechanisms of separatism and new arguments to justify a violation of Ukraine’s territorial integrity. As a result, all the events which took the international community by surprise in 2014 were nothing new. They were being tested earlier.

February 5, 2018 - Yury Lobunov

President Poroshenko’s zugzwang

President Petro Poroshenko has faced a dilemma. If he supports the reforms requested by pro-European part of Ukrainian society, he will act against the basic interests of his own circle. However, if he acts in line with the interests of his associates, he will eventually find himself among the enemies of pro-European reforms.

February 2, 2018 - Yaroslav Mendus

The dragon in the room

Despite China's assurances that Baku-Beijing-Tbilisi relations are to be based on the principle of equilibrium, with economic gain being the sole motivation, the impression of political dominance is hard to avoid. It is estimated that the old patterns of regional rivalries will further change with China’s expansions westwards, with China becoming a regional stabiliser.

January 30, 2018 - Małgosia Krakowska

The language of discord: Ukrainian, Hungarian, Romanian, Russian

Instead of building on the concept of child-centered education, the Ukrainian authorities will likely implement the poorly designed and unprepared educational reform that will bring nothing but further controversy.

January 29, 2018 - Ararat L. Osipian

What will 2018 bring for Central Europe?

Welcome to 2018! In this episode In Between Europe look back at the tumultuous events of last year and discuss what 2018 has in store for the region. Their guest is Tsveta Petrova, faculty at the European Institute at Columbia University, where she teaches and advises the MA students in European History, Politics, and Society.

January 26, 2018 - Zselyke Csaky and Gergely Romsics

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