Articles and Commentary

Informing without information: Russia in the age of Twitter

Twitter RussiaIn order to understand the wide-reaching implications of post-truth, one should first look at its sources. Alternative facts and post-truth have been used by governments, such as that of Russia, in the strategic shaping of national identity. In the initial hours and days after unexpected events, elite-level individuals play a decisive role in framing the mainstream interpretations despite the utter lack of concrete information. Even after further information comes out, the wider public will perceive it in the context of previously constructed narratives. In terms of social media, Twitter acts as ground zero for shaping interpretations due to its immediacy and the limited size of its posts.

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Ukraine’s choice: Nationalism vs. European values

Right Sector OdessaThe domineering of the far right in Ukraine, facilitated by the oligarchic mechanisms of power, has become a fact. It is not just a myth spread by Russian propaganda, although it is often exploited and aggrandised. The 2014 Revolution of Dignity and its aftermath was a turning point in Ukrainian history which marked an ideological split within the society into two camps, ultimately offering different paths for Ukraine’s national development.

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The black island of the Arctic

WanczykThis piece originally appeared in Issue 1/2017 of New Eastern Europe. Subscribe now.

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Estonia combats hacking with world’s first data embassy

hacking-2077124 960 720On June 20th, the prime ministers of Luxembourg and Estonia signed agreement establishing the world’s first data embassy — a secure building where Estonia will store its critical government and institutional data outside of its own borders.

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Pyongyang’s Russian sentiment

north koreaNorth Korea continues to play on a one man team as its nuclear tests only deepen the country’s isolation. South Korea, the United States and Japan are actively involved politically on the Korean peninsula but their goals rarely focus on issues other than international security. However, there are countries for which Kim Jong Un's regime is not only a target for international sanctions and criticism, but also an economic partner. China and Russia are part of that club. Paradoxically, maintaining good relations with Kim’s regime is important for Moscow as any potential dominance in Asia partly depends on Pyongyang’s support.

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  • The Road to Vilnius
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  • EuroMaidan

    New Eastern Europe's Continuing coverage of the Euromaidan Protests in Ukraine

    The Ukrainian government’s decision to put the country’s European integration on hold was met by a spontaneous protest of middle class and students. Three days later the rally organised by political parties attracted the biggest turnout since 2004 Orange revolution events.

     

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  • Intermarium
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