Text resize: A A
Change contrast

1918 – A geopolitical catastrophe for Ukraine

There is merit in perusing counterfactual history – which is not about what happened, but what could have happened. It allows us to reconsider simple questions and search for more precise answers. Why the Ukrainian revolution lost in 1918 is one such question.

When we recall 1918, within the context of Polish-Ukrainian relations, the first thing that springs to mind is the Polish-Ukrainian war for Lviv and Galicia. And this is only natural. This war has deeply influenced relations between the two societies for the decades that followed. As Christoph Mick described it in Lemberg, Lwów, L'viv, 1914-1947: Violence and Ethnicity in a Contested City, interactions between Poles, Ukrainians and Jews – until the horrors of the Second World War – developed under the influence of the memory of November 1918. Poles celebrated the victory and Ukrainians prepared for revenge, while Jews contemplated memories of the pogrom staged by the Polish army when it marched into Lviv and hence feared Polish antisemitism more than Ukrainian antisemitism.
To access this content, you must subscribe to NEE, or log in if you are a subscriber. Not a subscriber? Why not try it out. Plans start at just €5 per month.

November 5, 2018 - Yaroslav Hrytsak - Articles and CommentaryIssue 6 2018Magazine

Symon Petliura with Ukrainian troops in May 1920 in Kyiv. The final attempt to force the Bolsheviks back was launched with the “Kyiv Offensive” in alliance with Poland and Józef Piłsudski. The Ukrainian troops lost and the Bolsheviks pushed forward towards Warsaw. Source: Polish Central Military Archive (CC) commons.wikimedia.org

, , ,

Partners

Terms of Use | Cookie policy | Copyryight 2018 Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego 31-153 Kraków
webdesign : projektowanie stron - hauerpower