Text resize: A A
Change contrast
new Eastern Europe Krakow new Eastern Europe

Belarus’s complicated memory

Belarus has no institutionalised historical policy. The myths that are used in forming official historical policy today are largely shaped by the previous Soviet ones as well as the official state ideology, which places the Belarusian president at its core.

A characteristic feature for many post-Soviet states is a need to develop their own national historical policy, or politics of memory. This is a way to present societies with an adequate image of the past and confirm a collective identity. Belarus is no different in this regard. Unlike its neighbouring states, however, it has one more goal to achieve: it needs to create a shared national identity in a newly independent state.

It is quite noticeable that even though a quarter century has passed since regaining independence, Belarus has still not created its own, common historical policy, nor has it built a widely accepted national identity. That is why the fragmentation of historical memory, as well as the ideological and political disputes that accompany it, are present in today’s Belarus.
To access this content, you must subscribe to NEE, or log in if you are a subscriber. Not a subscriber? Why not try it out. Plans start at just €5 per month.

January 2, 2018 - Maxim Rust - Hot TopicsIssue 1 2018Magazine

Kurapaty is a nature reserve near Minsk where, during the 1937 – 1941 Great Terror, the NKVD shot an estimated 250,000 people. Photo: represii.net (CC) commons.wikimedia.org

,

Partners

Terms of Use | Cookie policy | Copyryight 2018 Kolegium Europy Wschodniej im. Jana Nowaka-Jeziorańskiego 31-153 Kraków
tworzenie stron www : hauerpower.com studio krakow.